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je10 36M
804 posts
3/14/2007 9:27 pm

Last Read:
4/13/2007 11:05 pm

First Ever World Map of Happiness Produced

University of Leicester Produces the first ever World Map of Happiness
Happiness is ...being Healthy, Wealthy and Wise


Denmark 'happiest place on earth'
Adrian White, from the UK's University of Leicester, used the responses of 80,000 people worldwide to map out subjective wellbeing.
Denmark came top, followed closely by Switzerland and Austria. The UK ranked 41st. Zimbabwe and Burundi came bottom.
A nation's level of happiness was most closely associated with health levels.


Prosperity and education were the next strongest determinants of national happiness.

Mr White, who is an analytic social psychologist at the university, said: "When people are asked if they are happy with their lives, people in countries with good healthcare, a higher GDP [gross domestic product] per capita, and access to education were much more likely to report being happy."

He acknowledged that these measures of happiness are not perfect, but said they were the best available and were the measures that politicians were talking of using to measure the relative performance of each country.

He said it would be possible to use these parameters to track changes in happiness, and what events may cause that, such as the effects a war, famine or national success might have on the happiness of people in a particular country.

Measuring happiness
He said: "There is increasing political interest in using measures of happiness as a national indicator in conjunction with measures of wealth.
"A recent BBC survey found that 81% of the population think the government should focus on making us happier rather than wealthier.
"It is worth remembering that the UK is doing relatively well in this area, coming 41st out of 178 nations."

He said he was surprised to see countries in Asia scoring so low, with China 82nd, Japan 90th and India 125th, because these are countries that are thought as having a strong sense of collective identity which other researchers have associated with well-being.

"It is also notable that many of the largest countries in terms of population do quite badly," he said.

He said: "The frustrations of modern life, and the anxieties of the age, seem to be much less significant compared to the health, financial and educational needs in other parts of the world."


The 20 happiest nations in the World are:
1 - Denmark
2 - Switzerland
3 - Austria
4 - Iceland
5 - The Bahamas
6 - Finland
7 - Sweden
8 - Bhutan
9 - Brunei
10 - Canada
11 - Ireland
12 - Luxembourg
13 - Costa Rica
14 - Malta
15 - The Netherlands
16 - Antigua and Barbuda
17 - Malaysia
18 - New Zealand
19 - Norway
20 - The Seychelles
Other notable results include:
23 - USA
35 - Germany
41 - UK
62 - France
82 - China
90 - Japan
125 - India
167 - Russia


The three least happy countries were:
176 - Democratic Republic of the Congo
177 - Zimbabwe
178 - Burundi


Source: University of Leicester
Note:
UK 41st out of 178 countries for happiness.
Happiness is found to be most closely associated with health, followed



Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


junjdo 62M
149 posts

3/15/2007 2:44 am

"Good health is the bedrock on which social progress is built.

A nation of healthy people can do those things that make life worthwhile, and as the level of health increases so does the potential for happiness" -


Marc Lalonde, Minister of National Health and Welfare, 1974.

Be the best of what you can be!


junjdo 62M
149 posts

3/15/2007 2:45 am

The facts are in, happy people are healthier!
--------------------------------------------

Medical science now has evidence to support something
most of us have known intuitively for awhile
- happiness, including feelings of joy, pleasure,
contentment, and our physical health are linked.


Be the best of what you can be!


junjdo 62M
149 posts

3/15/2007 2:46 am

Why are happy people more likely to be healthier?

A recently published research study, found that happiness leads to lower levels of stress chemicals in the body. Stress chemicals, like cortisol, are linked to serious health problems like abdominal obesity, Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and autoimmune disorders. People who report feeling happy more often, throughout the day, have lower levels of stress chemicals in their bodies. So, their risk of developing these diseases is smaller.


Be the best of what you can be!


junjdo 62M
149 posts

3/15/2007 2:47 am

What exactly is happiness?

For the participants in the above study, leisure time away from work and engaging in enjoyable activities were most often associated with feelings of happiness. Another study, a review of research studies on happiness from around the world, revealed that having positive family relationships, social networks, support networks and a sense of belonging were key aspects in ensuring people's happiness.


Be the best of what you can be!


junjdo 62M
149 posts

3/15/2007 2:49 am

Social support networks are also a key determinant
of health because their effect on our health
is estimated to be as important as risk factors
like smoking and obesity.

This underlines even further the importance of striving
to have positive relationships with others in our lives.


Be the best of what you can be!


junjdo 62M
149 posts

3/15/2007 2:50 am

hap·pi·ness : a state of well-being and contentment (Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary)

Happiness is one aspect of mental fitness

It's true that the meaning of happiness may vary from one person to another, and like beauty, it may be that its definition lies in the eye of the beholder. Nevertheless, the good news is that in order to achieve a happier life, there are clear steps we can all take. For example, the Canadian Mental Health Association urges us to focus on improving our mental fitness which "helps us to achieve and sustain a mentally healthy state, just as physical fitness helps us to achieve and sustain a state of good physical health."

Be the best of what you can be!


soan 36F
457 posts

3/15/2007 2:59 am

Simple ways to practice mental fitness

Here are some simple ways we can all start to practice mental fitness suggested by the Canadian Mental Health Association:


Daydream - Close your eyes and imagine yourself in a dream location. Breathe slowly and deeply. Whether it's a beach, a mountaintop, a hushed forest or a favourite room from your past, let the comforting environment wrap you in a sensation of peace and tranquility.

Everybody needs a hand 2hold,its a long trip alone


soan 36F
457 posts

3/15/2007 3:00 am

"Collect" positive emotional moments

- Make it a point to recall times when you have experienced pleasure, comfort, tenderness, confidence, or other positive emotions.

Everybody needs a hand 2hold,its a long trip alone


soan 36F
457 posts

3/15/2007 3:00 am

Learn ways to cope with negative thoughts

- Negative thoughts can be insistent and loud. Learn to interrupt them. Don't try to block them completely (that never works), but don't let them take over. Try distracting yourself or comforting yourself, if you can't solve the problem right away.

Everybody needs a hand 2hold,its a long trip alone


soan 36F
457 posts

3/15/2007 3:01 am

Do one thing at a time

- For example, when you are out for a walk or spending time with friends, turn off your cell phone and stop making that mental "to do" list. Take in all the sights, sounds and smells you encounter.

Everybody needs a hand 2hold,its a long trip alone


soan 36F
457 posts

3/15/2007 3:02 am

Exercise

- Regular physical activity improves psychological well-being and can reduce depression and anxiety. Joining an exercise group or a gym can also reduce loneliness, since it connects you with a new set of people sharing a common goal. Try your local recreation centre for free or low cost classes. Join - or start - a walking club in your neighbourhood.

Everybody needs a hand 2hold,its a long trip alone


soan 36F
457 posts

3/15/2007 3:04 am

Enjoy hobbies

- Taking up a hobby brings balance to your life by allowing you to do something you enjoy because you want to do it, free of the pressure of everyday tasks. It also keeps your brain active.

Everybody needs a hand 2hold,its a long trip alone


soan 36F
457 posts

3/15/2007 3:04 am

Set personal goals

- Goals don't have to be ambitious. You might decide to finish that book you started three years ago; to take a walk around the block every day; to try a new sport; to call your friends instead of waiting for the phone to ring. Whatever goal you set, reaching it will build confidence and a sense of satisfaction.

Everybody needs a hand 2hold,its a long trip alone


soan 36F
457 posts

3/15/2007 3:05 am

Keep a journal (or even talk to the wall!)

- Expressing yourself after a stressful day can help you gain perspective, release tension and even boost your body's resistance to illness.

Everybody needs a hand 2hold,its a long trip alone


soan 36F
457 posts

3/15/2007 3:06 am

Share humour

- Life often gets too serious, so when you hear or see something that makes you smile or laugh, share it with someone you know. A little humour can go a long way to keeping us mentally fit!

Everybody needs a hand 2hold,its a long trip alone


soan 36F
457 posts

3/15/2007 3:07 am

Volunteer

- Volunteering is called the "win-win" activity because helping others makes us feel good about ourselves. At the same time, it widens our social network, provides us with new learning experiences and can bring balance to our lives.

Everybody needs a hand 2hold,its a long trip alone


soan 36F
457 posts

3/15/2007 3:08 am

Treat yourself well

- Find simple pleasures that bring joy to your life. Read a book. Cook yourself a good meal. See a movie. Call a friend or relative you haven't talked to in ages. Whatever it is, do it just for you. Treating yourself doesn't have to involve a lot of money or time.
Start today on the road to a healthier and happier life!


Everybody needs a hand 2hold,its a long trip alone


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:04 am

Of all the national economic transformations that began during the 1980s -- China, Brazil, Russia, India, Mexico -- one of the most successful is one of the least attended. It was a poor little island at the beginning of the decade, driven by centuries of colonization and neglect. Twenty-five years later, a survey by the A.T. Kearney consulting firm would describe it as the most thoroughly globalized nation of all. An Economist Intelligence Unit survey would pronounce it the world's happiest nation, the single best place to live. (The United States came in thirteenth.)

For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:05 am

I mean, of course, not Mauritius, but Ireland. For around 300 years, the average income of its citizens was barely half that of Britain.

In 1500, the countries' ratio of gross domestic product per capita was 0.74; in 1600, 0.63; in 1700, 0.57; in 1850, 0.51; and, in the years from 1870 until 1913, an average of 0.56, where it more or less remained until 1970. During the next 35 years, the GDP ratio shot up from 0.74 to 1.15.


For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:06 am

What happened to turn Ireland around? What are the lessons for other nations?

As it happens, a particularly good guide has come to hand in the form of Ireland and the Global Question, by Michael J. O'Sullivan, an economist educated at University College, Cork and Balliol College, Oxford. He taught economics at Princeton, worked as a strategist at Goldman Sachs, UBS Warburg and Commerzbank before joining State Street Global Markets in 2003. His book has just been published in the United States by Syracuse University Press (and in Ireland by Cork University Press).

For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:07 am

Globalization has been kind to Ireland so far, O'Sullivan writes; but now significantly more demanding times lie ahead.

And while the experience of the "Celtic tiger" has been held out to others as a shining example of the awards that await successful adaptation to the changing world order, he says, in fact, Ireland enjoyed many advantages in its surge to modernity that other nations do not possess.


For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:08 am

O'Sullivan's title derives from that of a famous collection of essays and letters by Karl Marx and Frederich Engels.

Not just Marx and Engels speculated on the causes of Ireland's underdevelopment, he notes, but Adam Smith and Alexis de Tocqueville as well.

O'Sullivan devotes a chapter to their views.


For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:10 am

It was in 1779 that the British Board of Trade invited Smith to comment on trade restrictions imposed on Ireland. (He blamed self-serving English merchants, and advised that their restrictions be abolished.)

Tocqueville passed through in the summer of 1835, on his way to America. "What a complexity of miseries five centuries of oppression, civil disorders and religious hostility have piled on this poor people," he wrote to his father.


For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:11 am

And in the wake of the Great Famine, Marx and Engels observed,

"How often have the Irish set out to achieve something and each time been crushed, politically and industriallyÉ Ireland has been stunted in her development by the English invasion and thrown centuries back."

To break free, Marx counseled independence, an agricultural revolution, and protective tariffs against England.


For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:12 am

A Malthusian crisis preoccupied Ireland for most of the nineteenth century.

From barely a million persons in 1500, its population grew to 7.1 million in 1820 and peaked at 8.5 million in 1845, before abruptly declining to 6.3 million in 1852 and 5 million in 1870.

More than a million people died during the Famine, but many more simply left, most of them for the United States.


For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:13 am

This occurred, of course, during history's first great wave of globalization, when economies as distant from one another as Russia, Argentina, Australia and the United States were linking up; O'Sullivan notes that Ireland's participation was limited to contributing its great out-migration.

By 1921, there were only 3 million people living in Ireland.


For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:14 am

A political crisis dominated much of the twentieth century. Inflection points in the long history of Irish rebellion are many, but the Easter Rising of 1916, when a small band of nationalists in Dublin proclaimed Irish independence, only to be quickly suppressed, stands out.

By 1919 the island was embroiled in an outright war of independence. A treaty with Great Britain in 1921 created the Irish Free State as an autonomous member of the Commonwealth, but six mainly Protestant counties in the northeastern corner of the island were permitted to opt out, Northern Ireland, preferring to continue to be ruled by Britain. A civil war started immediately. It smoldered, on-and-off, for the next seventy-five years.


For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:15 am

O'Sullivan skips over "The Troubles" to take up the underlying causes of Ireland's rapid economic development after 1970; he mostly ignores the remarkable political compromises of the 1980s and 1990s among the government, employers and trade unions as well.

Several domestic factors are now acknowledged to have favored late-stage industrialization, he writes: Ireland's extensive system of universal education, the rapid expansion of credit, leadership of the Industrial Development Authority, entry into the European Community in 1973, and its flexible work force.


For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:16 am

But a number of outside factors were working in Ireland's favor during those years as well: the globalization of capital markets, the liberalization of trade, declining interest rates after 1982, the diminution of political risk and the advent of new technologies, especially computers. (In the 1850s, secret societies formed in Ireland with a view to throwing off the yoke of British colonialism and joining the United States; in the 1990s, an avalanche of direct American investment, especially in hardware manufacturing and software, all but turned Ireland into a 51st state, economically speaking.)

For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:18 am

This "stew of variables" is what makes Ireland a fascinating case, he writes. It also means that its lessons should be applied to other nations with utmost caution. Just because Ireland boomed doesn't mean East Germany will move quickly from relative poverty to wealth. (English is not the working language in Leipzig!) Just because the cluster of policies known as "the Washington consensus" served Ireland admirably well in its moment of truth doesn't mean the same recipe -- free trade, fiscal discipline, tax reform, streamlined regulation and lean public spending -- will work equally well for South American nations. Times change; so do external circumstances.

For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:19 am

The excitement in Ireland today is of a different sort. Its property bubble is its most conspicuous feature.

Land and house prices have risen to dizzying heights.

When Ireland experiences the inevitable downside of its asset boom, the ill effects will be felt by those who are least prepared for it, says O'Sullivan -- the last to buy and the poor who are heavily indebted.


For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:19 am

The role of the state in ameliorating the side effects of globalization, inequality and risk-shifting, is very important, especially in a small country.

"Irish society has been turned upside down," he writes, "rebuffing everything that made up pre-globalized Ireland (the Church and trust in institutions, to mention a couple) while embracing all that is new (consumerism, capitalism).

"Large inequalities of income and wealth are rife; the social fabric is strained. Smith and Marx and Tocqueville alike observed that happiness had much to do with relative standing -- well-being measured vis-a-vis parents, neighbors, children over time.


For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:20 am

Watching how the government performs its role as a buffer
against the forces of globalization in Ireland should prove instructive for other nations, he concludes.

The continued happiness of the Celtic Tiger requires that
its citizens share broadly in the benefits of its newfound
good fortune.


For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:21 am

There are worse problems than the prospect of asset disinflation and, say, three percent annual growth for a year or two, of course. (Real growth has been between 4.4 to 6.2 percent every year since 2000 to 2005, and the unemployment rate has hovered around 4 percent.)

The story of Ireland's economic miracle is that of a nation that suffered long and finally got what at least some of what it deserved.


For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:22 am

To his home audience, O'Sullivan quotes the writer Sean O'Faolain, who died in 1991:
--------------------------------

"The new Ireland is still learning the old lessons the hard way, like a brilliant but arrogant boy whose very brilliance acts as a dam against experience, so that he learns everything quickly -- except experience."


For God & Country duty first!


Banjo70 44M
1269 posts

3/15/2007 8:23 am

To the audience of other nations around the world, let the last word belong to Adam Smith. More than 225 years ago, he told the Board of Trade, "Should the Industry of Ireland, in consequence of freedom and good Government, ever equal that of England, so much the better would it be, not only for the whole British Empire, but for the particular province of England.

As the wealth and industry of Lancashire does not obstruct, but promote that of Yorkshire; so the wealth and industry of Ireland, would not obstruct, but promote that of England."


For God & Country duty first!


dunlop3764 50M
4941 posts

3/15/2007 9:03 am

Happy people

Inquirer
Last updated 01:02am (Mla time) 07/18/2006

Published on page A10 of the July 18, 2006 issue of the Philippine Daily Inquirer


A STUDY that measures quality of life against environmental impact recently showed that the tiny South Pacific Ocean archipelago of Vanuatu is the happiest country on earth. The same study, made by the British think tank New Economics Foundation, ranked the Philippines 17th in the Happy Planet Index.

Be swift 2LOVE make haste 2B kind
DUnLop


dunlop3764 50M
4941 posts

3/15/2007 9:04 am

The index strips the view of the economy back to the absolute basics: what we put in (resources) and what comes out (human lives of different length and happiness).

The index combines life satisfaction, life expectancy and environmental footprint -- the amount of land required to sustain the population and absorb its energy consumption.


Be swift 2LOVE make haste 2B kind
DUnLop


dunlop3764 50M
4941 posts

3/15/2007 9:05 am

This is not the first time that the Philippines has ranked high in “happiness” surveys and studies.

Several years ago, a Hong Kong ad agency found the Philippines to be the happiest place among a group that included Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and China.


Be swift 2LOVE make haste 2B kind
DUnLop


dunlop3764 50M
4941 posts

3/15/2007 9:06 am

The World Values Survey published by the University of Michigan in November 2004 showed the Philippines to be the “happiest” among Asian countries, purportedly because 93 percent of Filipinos are happy, followed by Japan with 90 percent; Taiwan, 89 percent; China 84 percent; Pakistan, 83 percent; and Indonesia, 77 percent. The World Health Organization has also found that the Philippines has the lowest suicide rate in Asia.

Be swift 2LOVE make haste 2B kind
DUnLop


dunlop3764 50M
4941 posts

3/15/2007 9:08 am

In the 2001 round done by the Social Weather Stations poll group for World Values Survey, the Philippines ranked 31st, slightly above the international average of happiest people.

And among Asian nations, the Philippines ranked 7th, after Indonesia and Singapore, both 95 percent; Vietnam, 92 percent; Taiwan, 91 percent; Japan, 89 percent; and South Korea, 88 percent.


Be swift 2LOVE make haste 2B kind
DUnLop


dunlop3764 50M
4941 posts

3/15/2007 9:09 am

The self-perception that the Philippines is one of the happiest countries on Earth is paradoxical, because it is one of the poorest and most deprived nations.

Thirty percent of the people live below the poverty threshold; many families eat only two meals a day. Millions have no access to medical and health services and many people die without even seeing or enjoying the services of a doctor.


Be swift 2LOVE make haste 2B kind
DUnLop


dunlop3764 50M
4941 posts

3/15/2007 9:10 am

How can we Filipinos remain optimistic and happy when our nation is not only suffering from grinding poverty but also from unceasing political turmoil, unabated graft and corruption and environmental destruction? On top of this, the Center for Research and Epidemiology of Disasters has ranked the Philippines as the world’s most disaster-prone country.

Not a year passes that the Philippines is not struck by floods, typhoons, landslides, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and even by -- only in the Philippines -- “trash” slides. It is not an exaggeration to say that at any time, somewhere in the country there is a place that is just waiting for a disaster to happen.


Be swift 2LOVE make haste 2B kind
DUnLop


dunlop3764 50M
4941 posts

3/15/2007 9:10 am

Alan C. Robles, writing in Time Asia in February 2005, said that for Filipinos “happiness isn’t material -- it’s social. We’re happiest in a group: family, friends, immediate community, even strangers.”

The group is the Filipinos’ defense against life’s unfairness. Robles also said that Filipinos are known for their resilience and self-sufficiency.


Be swift 2LOVE make haste 2B kind
DUnLop


dunlop3764 50M
4941 posts

3/15/2007 9:11 am

Inquirer columnist Michael L. Tan, an anthropologist, said that Filipinos survive because they anticipate the worst.

“Because we expect the worst, we are ‘happy’ with whatever happens,” he said.

And so “happiness,” in the sense of “saya,” becomes in itself a coping mechanism with the bad things that happen to us in life.


Be swift 2LOVE make haste 2B kind
DUnLop


dunlop3764 50M
4941 posts

3/15/2007 9:12 am

Resilience and self-sufficiency: fate may throw anything at the Filipino but he will be able to cope with it.

No jobs in the Philippines? Work as an overseas contract worker. Income insufficient to make both ends meet? Start a small business as a “sideline.” Daily earnings not sufficient? Eat cheap noodles every day.

“Ba(t)hala na.” Leave it to God, and God will take care of you.


Be swift 2LOVE make haste 2B kind
DUnLop


dunlop3764 50M
4941 posts

3/15/2007 9:13 am

Even in dealing with social and political problems, Filipinos resort to humor and merriment to cope with worrisome situations.

Political jokes go the rounds of barbershops, coffee shops, restaurants and bars -- any place where Filipinos congregate and socialize.

When they feel almost powerless to cope with a political problem, Filipinos crack jokes. They can thus forget their misery and misfortune and go on to face another day.


Be swift 2LOVE make haste 2B kind
DUnLop


dunlop3764 50M
4941 posts

3/15/2007 9:13 am

Bertrand Russell said that “the secret of happiness is to face the fact that the world is horrible, horrible, horrible.”

We suspect that we Filipinos have all along known this truth. In the face of so much poverty, misery and trouble, we can still smile and remain happy.


Be swift 2LOVE make haste 2B kind
DUnLop


jangol 40F
457 posts

3/15/2007 11:27 am

A Simple And Happy People
By: Elmer Anthony Olaer


The Filipinos are considered a simple and happy people. This is evidenced by the fact that many Filipinos love to celebrate for any reason even with meager resources.

~Life is blooey only if U make it one~


jangol 40F
457 posts

3/15/2007 11:28 am

The cheerful disposition of Filipinos
may sometimes surprise and strike the foreigner
as a lack of seriousness but upon knowing
more about the customs in the Philippines,
one would understand that cheerfulness
is a part the country's culture.


~Life is blooey only if U make it one~


jangol 40F
457 posts

3/15/2007 11:29 am

Family bonds are strong in the Filipinos.
If ever there are reasons to celebrate a certain occasion,
no matter how insignificant, Filipinos take the opportunity
to have reunions and family gatherings.

These celebrations include not just the immediate family
but other relatives as well, such as uncles, aunties, cousins, nephews, nieces, and grandparents.


~Life is blooey only if U make it one~


jangol 40F
457 posts

3/15/2007 11:30 am

For example, Filipinos love to celebrate different occasions that include, among other occasions, the passing of a state board examination of a member of the family, job promotions, "bienvenidas" or "welcome back" celebrations (e.g. the arrival of someone after working some time in another country), "despedidas" or "send-off or farewell parties", such as when a family member would live or work abroad, and even town fiestas, where an entire town celebrates the feast of its patron saint.

~Life is blooey only if U make it one~


jangol 40F
457 posts

3/15/2007 11:30 am

Filipinos love fiestas. "Fiesta" means feast and this custom was adapted from the Spaniards, who introduced Christianity in the Philippines.

The fiesta is an occasion to give thanks for all the blessings
that a town has received.


~Life is blooey only if U make it one~


jangol 40F
457 posts

3/15/2007 11:31 am

Of course, Filipinos also love to celebrate thanksgiving parties,

such as when a family member got cured of a long illness,

or simply when a family likes to just thank God for the many

blessings that have been bestowed on them.


~Life is blooey only if U make it one~


jangol 40F
457 posts

3/15/2007 11:32 am

Celebrating birthdays, anniversaries, even death anniversaries, baptisms or christening, Christmas and Easter, are standard celebrations which include the entire extended family.

For example, I would not be surprised if suddenly, all my relatives visit my home during my birthday or when they come over for Christmas.


~Life is blooey only if U make it one~


jangol 40F
457 posts

3/15/2007 11:33 am

Celebrating Christmas in the Philippines is probably the longest in the entire world.

The spirit of Christmas usually fills the air during the "ber" months -- September, October, November and December, and usually until the first few weeks of January.


~Life is blooey only if U make it one~


jangol 40F
457 posts

3/15/2007 11:34 am

Come September, one would already hear Christmas carols

being aired over the radio. Malls and department stores

would start their "Christmas" sale and some would even

go as far as having Christmas decorations by September.


~Life is blooey only if U make it one~


jangol 40F
457 posts

3/15/2007 11:35 am

Everyone looks forward to Christmas as this would be a great occasion

to visit families in the province, especially if someone spends the

entire year working in a distant city. Many companies usually go on

vacation beginning a week before Christmas, December 25, until the

first week of January.


~Life is blooey only if U make it one~


jangol 40F
457 posts

3/15/2007 11:35 am

During the Christmas season, it is not unusual for someone to attend several Christmas parties.

There is a Christmas party with office friends, another party with high school classmates or even university batchmates, parties with the members of one's sports club, company sponsored parties, and of course, several family Christmas parties.


~Life is blooey only if U make it one~


jangol 40F
457 posts

3/15/2007 11:37 am

During Christmas, I usually watch my diet since there is usually a lot of eating!
--------------------------------------

Elmer Anthony Olaer is an avid traveller, writer and webmaster of A2 Philippine travel and vacation website. He is also the webmaster of Ola Macau Travel and the China Hong Kong travel web sites.

~Life is blooey only if U make it one~


cherie620 35F
1529 posts

3/15/2007 11:45 am

Filipinos - A Simple And Happy People

The Filipinos are considered a simple and happy people.

This is evidenced by the fact that many Filipinos love to celebrate for any reason even with meager resources.

-----------------------------------------

One thing you must not miss if ever you are here during the Christmas season is to attend the "Missa de Gallo" or Mass at Dawn.

Each day is ours to live & share.


cherie620 35F
1529 posts

3/15/2007 11:46 am

A Mass is the celebration central to Christianity.

Even if you are not a Catholic, nor even a Christian,
and even if you don't believe in God, it would be good
to attend one of these Masses, or celebrations
if you want to call them.


Each day is ours to live & share.


cherie620 35F
1529 posts

3/15/2007 11:47 am

You will definitely learn a lot from this celebration
if you listen closely to the things that are said
during the mass.

If you want to know more about the Filipinos,
it would be very helpful if you learn about the Philippine's religious roots, which have been planted by the Spaniards.


Each day is ours to live & share.


cherie620 35F
1529 posts

3/15/2007 11:47 am

The Philippine started to become a colony of

Spain in the 16th century and, in spite of the many negative things

that many historians have said about this, we Filipinos in fact owe

to the Spaniards our civilization.


Each day is ours to live & share.


cherie620 35F
1529 posts

3/15/2007 11:48 am

Since I am not a historian, I will not be able to say much more about

our deep and rich history but I must say that a complete

understanding of the Filipino culture would mean that one must at

least know Christianity and the time when we were a colony of Spain.


Each day is ours to live & share.


cherie620 35F
1529 posts

3/15/2007 11:49 am

Now, let's leave off history and go back to our discussion about celebrations.

Another fact that illustrates that the Filipinos love to celebrate is that they always want to dine.


Each day is ours to live & share.


cherie620 35F
1529 posts

3/15/2007 11:50 am

All family gatherings or celebrations are occasions for dining and these celebrations are usually called "handaan".

The word "handaan" literary means "preparation".

However, the word "handaan" signifies the preparation that someone has done for a celebration. So, do not be surprised if the word "party" and "handaan" are used interchangeably.


Each day is ours to live & share.


cherie620 35F
1529 posts

3/15/2007 11:51 am

Another remarkable characteristic of the Filipinos is that they are a loving and caring people.

There was once a question posted to Ms. Precious Lara, a Filipino candidate on the 2005 Miss International Beauty Contest on what she thought of the idea that Filipinos abroad have typecasted Filipinos as nannies.


Each day is ours to live & share.


cherie620 35F
1529 posts

3/15/2007 11:52 am

Ms. Lara's answer was, "I take no offense on being typecasted as a nanny. But I do take offense that the educated people of the world have somehow denigrated the true sense and meaning of what a nanny is.

Let me tell you what she is.


Each day is ours to live & share.


cherie620 35F
1529 posts

3/15/2007 11:53 am

She is someone who gives more than she takes.

She is someone you trust to look after the very people most precious to you - your child, the elderly, yourself.

She is the one who has made a living out of caring and loving other people.

So to those who have typecasted us as nannies, Thank you.


Each day is ours to live & share.


cherie620 35F
1529 posts

3/15/2007 11:53 am

It is a testament to the loving and caring culture of the Filipino people.

And for that, I am forever proud and grateful of my roots and culture."

Anyone may look at us as nannies. But we are loving, caring, and happy nannies, so I guess that should be taken by every Filipino as a complement


Each day is ours to live & share.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 11:56 am

    Quoting chinatree:
    See Yourself Smiling
    Successful & Happy
    ------------------

    Want to feel happy whenever you please?
    Try this...

    Stop for a moment, detach from what you're doing.
    Take a few deep breaths and relax.
Hi Cat! Nice to see you!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 11:56 am

    Quoting chinatree:
    In your mind's eye, see yourself smiling, successful and happy.

    Take a moment to relish those good feelings, connect with them and make them your own.

    Now radiate and project positive, happy, successful feelings.

    You'll find yourself smiling, and feeling happy and successful.
Talk about winners! I'm sure you are one!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 11:57 am

    Quoting chinatree:
    We tend to take on the feelings
    we consciously choose to focus on,
    radiate and project.

    If you summon up a sense of joy
    and honestly project it,
    you will feel genuinely joyful
    and positive.

I couldn't agree more! You said it the way I wanted to!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 11:58 am

    Quoting chinatree:
    When you
    summon up
    a sense of fun
    and sparkle
    and radiate it
    you can
    take on
    those feelings
    genuinely
    for yourself.
Happiness like the sun radiates to all the people around you!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 11:59 am

    Quoting chinatree:
    If you
    continually
    try
    to touch
    each person
    you meet
    with
    a smile
    and a positive spirit,
    you will be happier.
sEEING OTHERS HAPPY and KNOWING YOU ARE the SOURCE IS ENOUGH REWARD!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:01 pm

    Quoting junjdo:
    "Good health is the bedrock on which social progress is built.

    A nation of healthy people can do those things that make life worthwhile, and as the level of health increases so does the potential for happiness" -

    Marc Lalonde, Minister of National Health and Welfare, 1974.
MOST CERTAINLY THIS IS TRUE. A HEALTHY PERSON IS A HAPPY PERSON

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:02 pm

    Quoting junjdo:
    The facts are in, happy people are healthier!
    --------------------------------------------

    Medical science now has evidence to support something
    most of us have known intuitively for awhile
    - happiness, including feelings of joy, pleasure,
    contentment, and our physical health are linked.
CHOOSE to be HAPPY ... CHOOSE to be HEALTHY

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:03 pm

    Quoting junjdo:
    Why are happy people more likely to be healthier?

    A recently published research study, found that happiness leads to lower levels of stress chemicals in the body. Stress chemicals, like cortisol, are linked to serious health problems like abdominal obesity, Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and autoimmune disorders. People who report feeling happy more often, throughout the day, have lower levels of stress chemicals in their bodies. So, their risk of developing these diseases is smaller.
Why sweat the stuff when you can take it easy!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:04 pm

    Quoting junjdo:
    What exactly is happiness?

    For the participants in the above study, leisure time away from work and engaging in enjoyable activities were most often associated with feelings of happiness. Another study, a review of research studies on happiness from around the world, revealed that having positive family relationships, social networks, support networks and a sense of belonging were key aspects in ensuring people's happiness.
To me it is having fun, havig time for family and friends and being worry free!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:05 pm

    Quoting junjdo:
    Social support networks are also a key determinant
    of health because their effect on our health
    is estimated to be as important as risk factors
    like smoking and obesity.

    This underlines even further the importance of striving
    to have positive relationships with others in our lives.
Stay happy ... be Healthy!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:07 pm

    Quoting junjdo:
    hap·pi·ness : a state of well-being and contentment (Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary)

    Happiness is one aspect of mental fitness

    It's true that the meaning of happiness may vary from one person to another, and like beauty, it may be that its definition lies in the eye of the beholder. Nevertheless, the good news is that in order to achieve a happier life, there are clear steps we can all take. For example, the Canadian Mental Health Association urges us to focus on improving our mental fitness which "helps us to achieve and sustain a mentally healthy state, just as physical fitness helps us to achieve and sustain a state of good physical health."
When you are happy, you are inspired to do better, and you can think more clearly and positively!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:09 pm

    Quoting soan:
    Simple ways to practice mental fitness

    Here are some simple ways we can all start to practice mental fitness suggested by the Canadian Mental Health Association:

    Daydream - Close your eyes and imagine yourself in a dream location. Breathe slowly and deeply. Whether it's a beach, a mountaintop, a hushed forest or a favourite room from your past, let the comforting environment wrap you in a sensation of peace and tranquility.
they're Easy ways to follow! it's so nice of you to share them here!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:10 pm

    Quoting soan:
    "Collect" positive emotional moments

    - Make it a point to recall times when you have experienced pleasure, comfort, tenderness, confidence, or other positive emotions.
It's wonderful to reminisce sweet moments. IT makes the heart sing!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:11 pm

    Quoting soan:
    Learn ways to cope with negative thoughts

    - Negative thoughts can be insistent and loud. Learn to interrupt them. Don't try to block them completely (that never works), but don't let them take over. Try distracting yourself or comforting yourself, if you can't solve the problem right away.
Cast it aside ... don't let it bother you!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:12 pm

    Quoting soan:
    Do one thing at a time

    - For example, when you are out for a walk or spending time with friends, turn off your cell phone and stop making that mental "to do" list. Take in all the sights, sounds and smells you encounter.
The more you try to achieve, the more you feel under pressure!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:14 pm

    Quoting soan:
    Exercise

    - Regular physical activity improves psychological well-being and can reduce depression and anxiety. Joining an exercise group or a gym can also reduce loneliness, since it connects you with a new set of people sharing a common goal. Try your local recreation centre for free or low cost classes. Join - or start - a walking club in your neighbourhood.
Exercise keeps you busy, trims you down and makes you look good, which in turn makes you feel good about yourself!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:14 pm

    Quoting soan:
    Enjoy hobbies

    - Taking up a hobby brings balance to your life by allowing you to do something you enjoy because you want to do it, free of the pressure of everyday tasks. It also keeps your brain active.
These provides you time to have a breather!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:16 pm

    Quoting soan:
    Set personal goals

    - Goals don't have to be ambitious. You might decide to finish that book you started three years ago; to take a walk around the block every day; to try a new sport; to call your friends instead of waiting for the phone to ring. Whatever goal you set, reaching it will build confidence and a sense of satisfaction.
Goals are catalysts for action because it is a step towards achievement!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:17 pm

    Quoting soan:
    Keep a journal (or even talk to the wall!)

    - Expressing yourself after a stressful day can help you gain perspective, release tension and even boost your body's resistance to illness.
This helps you to take stock of your life so as to guide you in the future days!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:18 pm

    Quoting soan:
    Share humour

    - Life often gets too serious, so when you hear or see something that makes you smile or laugh, share it with someone you know. A little humour can go a long way to keeping us mentally fit!
Sharing fun and laughter is a good way to set aside your worries!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:19 pm

    Quoting soan:
    Volunteer

    - Volunteering is called the "win-win" activity because helping others makes us feel good about ourselves. At the same time, it widens our social network, provides us with new learning experiences and can bring balance to our lives.
Keep busy and use your time productively!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:20 pm

    Quoting soan:
    Treat yourself well

    - Find simple pleasures that bring joy to your life. Read a book. Cook yourself a good meal. See a movie. Call a friend or relative you haven't talked to in ages. Whatever it is, do it just for you. Treating yourself doesn't have to involve a lot of money or time.
    Start today on the road to a healthier and happier life!
Love yourself AND be nice to yourself ... no one will care for you as much as you do!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:22 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    Of all the national economic transformations that began during the 1980s -- China, Brazil, Russia, India, Mexico -- one of the most successful is one of the least attended. It was a poor little island at the beginning of the decade, driven by centuries of colonization and neglect. Twenty-five years later, a survey by the A.T. Kearney consulting firm would describe it as the most thoroughly globalized nation of all. An Economist Intelligence Unit survey would pronounce it the world's happiest nation, the single best place to live. (The United States came in thirteenth.)
Hi bro ... nice of you to take time to share this!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:23 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    I mean, of course, not Mauritius, but Ireland. For around 300 years, the average income of its citizens was barely half that of Britain.

    In 1500, the countries' ratio of gross domestic product per capita was 0.74; in 1600, 0.63; in 1700, 0.57; in 1850, 0.51; and, in the years from 1870 until 1913, an average of 0.56, where it more or less remained until 1970. During the next 35 years, the GDP ratio shot up from 0.74 to 1.15.
I didn't know this; & if you hadn't shared it I wouldn't know at all

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:24 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    What happened to turn Ireland around? What are the lessons for other nations?

    As it happens, a particularly good guide has come to hand in the form of Ireland and the Global Question, by Michael J. O'Sullivan, an economist educated at University College, Cork and Balliol College, Oxford. He taught economics at Princeton, worked as a strategist at Goldman Sachs, UBS Warburg and Commerzbank before joining State Street Global Markets in 2003. His book has just been published in the United States by Syracuse University Press (and in Ireland by Cork University Press).
Very intersting ... I appreciate this info bro!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:26 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    Globalization has been kind to Ireland so far, O'Sullivan writes; but now significantly more demanding times lie ahead.

    And while the experience of the "Celtic tiger" has been held out to others as a shining example of the awards that await successful adaptation to the changing world order, he says, in fact, Ireland enjoyed many advantages in its surge to modernity that other nations do not possess.
It is a good example to all and truly inspiring to the world!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:27 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    O'Sullivan's title derives from that of a famous collection of essays and letters by Karl Marx and Frederich Engels.

    Not just Marx and Engels speculated on the causes of Ireland's underdevelopment, he notes, but Adam Smith and Alexis de Tocqueville as well.

    O'Sullivan devotes a chapter to their views.
Thanks so much for gathering all this info!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:28 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    It was in 1779 that the British Board of Trade invited Smith to comment on trade restrictions imposed on Ireland. (He blamed self-serving English merchants, and advised that their restrictions be abolished.)

    Tocqueville passed through in the summer of 1835, on his way to America. "What a complexity of miseries five centuries of oppression, civil disorders and religious hostility have piled on this poor people," he wrote to his father.
A monumental feat achieved indeed!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

3/15/2007 12:29 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    And in the wake of the Great Famine, Marx and Engels observed,

    "How often have the Irish set out to achieve something and each time been crushed, politically and industriallyÉ Ireland has been stunted in her development by the English invasion and thrown centuries back."

    To break free, Marx counseled independence, an agricultural revolution, and protective tariffs against England.
It only proves that determination and perseverance pays off!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


2dona2 46M
1522 posts

3/15/2007 10:58 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    A Malthusian crisis preoccupied Ireland for most of the nineteenth century.

    From barely a million persons in 1500, its population grew to 7.1 million in 1820 and peaked at 8.5 million in 1845, before abruptly declining to 6.3 million in 1852 and 5 million in 1870.

    More than a million people died during the Famine, but many more simply left, most of them for the United States.
For the country to rise again it did suffer a lot, but those who survived were determined to make it!


2dona2 46M
1522 posts

3/15/2007 11:00 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    This occurred, of course, during history's first great wave of globalization, when economies as distant from one another as Russia, Argentina, Australia and the United States were linking up; O'Sullivan notes that Ireland's participation was limited to contributing its great out-migration.

    By 1921, there were only 3 million people living in Ireland.
I can see how we are undergoing this type of globalization. When our people are forced to seek greener pastures abroad! But we seem to increase inspite of that!


2dona2 46M
1522 posts

3/15/2007 11:02 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    A political crisis dominated much of the twentieth century. Inflection points in the long history of Irish rebellion are many, but the Easter Rising of 1916, when a small band of nationalists in Dublin proclaimed Irish independence, only to be quickly suppressed, stands out.

    By 1919 the island was embroiled in an outright war of independence. A treaty with Great Britain in 1921 created the Irish Free State as an autonomous member of the Commonwealth, but six mainly Protestant counties in the northeastern corner of the island were permitted to opt out, Northern Ireland, preferring to continue to be ruled by Britain. A civil war started immediately. It smoldered, on-and-off, for the next seventy-five years.
Isn't that quite a long time to endure just like our insurgency problems in the rural areas particularly Mindanao?


2dona2 46M
1522 posts

3/15/2007 11:03 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    O'Sullivan skips over "The Troubles" to take up the underlying causes of Ireland's rapid economic development after 1970; he mostly ignores the remarkable political compromises of the 1980s and 1990s among the government, employers and trade unions as well.

    Several domestic factors are now acknowledged to have favored late-stage industrialization, he writes: Ireland's extensive system of universal education, the rapid expansion of credit, leadership of the Industrial Development Authority, entry into the European Community in 1973, and its flexible work force.
So the eductional area has a lot to do with its development!


2dona2 46M
1522 posts

3/15/2007 11:05 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    But a number of outside factors were working in Ireland's favor during those years as well: the globalization of capital markets, the liberalization of trade, declining interest rates after 1982, the diminution of political risk and the advent of new technologies, especially computers. (In the 1850s, secret societies formed in Ireland with a view to throwing off the yoke of British colonialism and joining the United States; in the 1990s, an avalanche of direct American investment, especially in hardware manufacturing and software, all but turned Ireland into a 51st state, economically speaking.)
Well everything worked to an advantage, it was timely as if events connived to fit the pieces of the puzzle together!


2dona2 46M
1522 posts

3/15/2007 11:08 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    This "stew of variables" is what makes Ireland a fascinating case, he writes. It also means that its lessons should be applied to other nations with utmost caution. Just because Ireland boomed doesn't mean East Germany will move quickly from relative poverty to wealth. (English is not the working language in Leipzig!) Just because the cluster of policies known as "the Washington consensus" served Ireland admirably well in its moment of truth doesn't mean the same recipe -- free trade, fiscal discipline, tax reform, streamlined regulation and lean public spending -- will work equally well for South American nations. Times change; so do external circumstances.
To each his own time and move ... it is true that there are numerous factors to consider before other nations learn from Ireland's fast recovery.


2dona2 46M
1522 posts

3/15/2007 11:09 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    The excitement in Ireland today is of a different sort. Its property bubble is its most conspicuous feature.

    Land and house prices have risen to dizzying heights.

    When Ireland experiences the inevitable downside of its asset boom, the ill effects will be felt by those who are least prepared for it, says O'Sullivan -- the last to buy and the poor who are heavily indebted.
So there are debt issues among the populace to be taken into account!


2dona2 46M
1522 posts

3/15/2007 11:11 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    The role of the state in ameliorating the side effects of globalization, inequality and risk-shifting, is very important, especially in a small country.

    "Irish society has been turned upside down," he writes, "rebuffing everything that made up pre-globalized Ireland (the Church and trust in institutions, to mention a couple) while embracing all that is new (consumerism, capitalism).

    "Large inequalities of income and wealth are rife; the social fabric is strained. Smith and Marx and Tocqueville alike observed that happiness had much to do with relative standing -- well-being measured vis-a-vis parents, neighbors, children over time.
the role of the government cannot therefore be disregarded in this aspect.


2dona2 46M
1522 posts

3/15/2007 11:12 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    Watching how the government performs its role as a buffer
    against the forces of globalization in Ireland should prove instructive for other nations, he concludes.

    The continued happiness of the Celtic Tiger requires that
    its citizens share broadly in the benefits of its newfound
    good fortune.
It only proves that a god government and responsible leadership plays a key role in the country's growth and prosperity!


2dona2 46M
1522 posts

3/15/2007 11:14 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    There are worse problems than the prospect of asset disinflation and, say, three percent annual growth for a year or two, of course. (Real growth has been between 4.4 to 6.2 percent every year since 2000 to 2005, and the unemployment rate has hovered around 4 percent.)

    The story of Ireland's economic miracle is that of a nation that suffered long and finally got what at least some of what it deserved.
Perseverance pays off ... discipline and hardwork too!


2dona2 46M
1522 posts

3/15/2007 11:17 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    To his home audience, O'Sullivan quotes the writer Sean O'Faolain, who died in 1991:
    --------------------------------

    "The new Ireland is still learning the old lessons the hard way, like a brilliant but arrogant boy whose very brilliance acts as a dam against experience, so that he learns everything quickly -- except experience."
It's for us to learn from this example that aside from using one's knowledge, it should also go side by side with caution and careful planning of each step!


2dona2 46M
1522 posts

3/15/2007 11:20 pm

    Quoting Banjo70:
    To the audience of other nations around the world, let the last word belong to Adam Smith. More than 225 years ago, he told the Board of Trade, "Should the Industry of Ireland, in consequence of freedom and good Government, ever equal that of England, so much the better would it be, not only for the whole British Empire, but for the particular province of England.

    As the wealth and industry of Lancashire does not obstruct, but promote that of Yorkshire; so the wealth and industry of Ireland, would not obstruct, but promote that of England."
Strength and success can only be achieved by cooperation with the motherland. It is not good to cut the umbilical cord prematurely!


shery1 30F
768 posts

3/16/2007 12:39 am

July 30, 2006
How happy are Filipinos?
If you can prove the Danes are the happiest people on earth you can prove anything


The latest fatuous index of national “happiness” has gloomy Denmark chortling at the top of the pile and the Philippines languishing at 78, just behind “the land of smiles”, Thailand, at 76. The creator of this nonsensical project, an academic at the University of Leicester in the UK, has even provided a map of world “happiness”.

Love your haters, they're your biggest fan!


shery1 30F
768 posts

3/16/2007 12:39 am

Earlier this happy month, another guide to global bliss, the “Happy Planet Index”, had the island nation of Vanuatu in first place, with the Philippines a respectable 17 (Denmark was in 99th place).

These wildly differing results can be partly explained by methodological differences. The Leicester index places the highest value on health statistics, while the New Economics Foundation (compilers of the “Happy Planet Index” concentrates on “life satisfaction”, life expectancy and environmental footprint.


Love your haters, they're your biggest fan!


shery1 30F
768 posts

3/16/2007 12:40 am


But isn’t the whole idea of indices to measure “happiness” nonsense? How can you conjure up objective variables to measure a subjective feeling like happiness?

You can compile all the data you like, but in the end just look around you. That’s really the best way to figure out who is happy and who is not.


Love your haters, they're your biggest fan!


shery1 30F
768 posts

3/16/2007 12:41 am

To start the ball rolling, the “torn and frayed dismal planet index” includes China, Britain, Russia, Cuba, and, yes, Denmark in the dark countries.

On the other hand, people in Thailand, Italy, Ecuador, Australia, and the Philippines seem, in general, pretty glad to be alive.


Love your haters, they're your biggest fan!


shery1 30F
768 posts

3/16/2007 12:42 am

You can argue with my selection of countries of course, that’s fine by me. Just don’t tell me that, say, Denmark, “ought” to be happy because of its fabulous health statistics.

I have a couple of wonderful Danish friends, but when I visited Copenhagen people would turn away when I asked for directions. Some friends of mine were virtually assaulted when they stepped into a cycle lane. And let’s not even mention dogme movies, Søren Kierkegaard, or Hamlet. Denmark, the happiest country in the world?
That’s just hilarious.


Love your haters, they're your biggest fan!


shery1 30F
768 posts

3/16/2007 12:42 am

Which brings us to our island home.

Let’s face it, Pinoys have just about every reason you can think of to be miserable.

Yet the crowds of people in jeepney hell under the Taft–EDSA intersection just can’t stop laughing and joking. It’s raining and I’m getting soaked?

Ha, ha, uproarious! Crossed the road and nearly got run over–what a hoot!


Love your haters, they're your biggest fan!


shery1 30F
768 posts

3/16/2007 12:43 am

It seems there is nothing that will stop Filipinos from having a good time. Their objective circumstances seem to have little to do with it ‒

Filipinos just are happy (illogical or just plain nutty though that might be).

I’m gonna try to figure out why that is in a subsequent post, but in the meantime if you have any ideas just leave me a wee comment below.


Love your haters, they're your biggest fan!


shery1 30F
768 posts

3/16/2007 5:10 am

My conclusion is Denmark subjectively feels happy in terms of health, wealth and wisdom ... but happiness is measured way beyond those things.

Values, family relations, culture and social conditions are to be considered as well. In this regard this is where we Filipinos rank higher.


Love your haters, they're your biggest fan!


ROXYBARBIE 46F
14614 posts

3/16/2007 9:32 pm

British residents find their level of happiness dropping and many want their government to step in, a poll concludes.

Pollster GfK NOP found 36 percent of people asked are "very happy," compared to 52 percent found in a 1957 Gallup poll.


ROXYBARBIE 46F
14614 posts

3/16/2007 9:33 pm

The Telegraph reports happiness of residents in Britain has dropped as personal wealth has grown but many respondents want the government to concentrate less on economics and more on general bliss.


ROXYBARBIE 46F
14614 posts

3/16/2007 9:34 pm

"Extra income is not generating extra happiness in society," said Professor Richard Layard, director of the Center for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

The study of 1,001 people in Britain found 56 percent of those asked were "fairly happy," five percent "fairly unhappy" and three percent "very unhappy."


ROXYBARBIE 46F
14614 posts

3/16/2007 9:34 pm

Eighty-one percent said the government should have the public's happiness as a priority over the 13 percent who sided with the public's pocketbook


ROXYBARBIE 46F
14614 posts

3/16/2007 9:45 pm

The happiness is something a little bit abstract concept that somehow we associate with our emotional state, and our emotional state depends of our point of view in a moment of our lives and it's hard to generalize to everyone...

I think it's better a study about our life behaviours and satisfactions.


ROXYBARBIE 46F
14614 posts

3/16/2007 10:01 pm

We also have to consider cultural-impact on the answers given. Some cultures such as the UK and Japan engender the response of 'average'. This can mean that some nations score poorly because their culture means that when asked how good things are they do not like to 'show off' or 'over estimate' things thus creating a potential 'average' response.

Personally the things I think make for happy people in a country:


*Social mobility - far more important than money is the ability to move between social groups
*Safety - low crime and stable finances will make it easier to concentrate on what makes you happy
*A 'can do' culture - hard to measure but the 'american dream' long stood as a flag that said america was a land of opportunity and positive thinking (I think an amount of this has been lost to anti-americanism unfortunately)
*Variety of experiences - the nations listed that jump out at me have varied climates, varied environments and so that constant change I believe makes things better than the feeling of 'always the same'

I think individual outlook plays a huge role, the old adage that "as one door closes another opens" may make some cynics kuffaw but I like its outlook.


joyes 38F
1129 posts

3/17/2007 12:25 am

    Quoting shery1:
    July 30, 2006
    How happy are Filipinos?
    If you can prove the Danes are the happiest people on earth you can prove anything


    The latest fatuous index of national “happiness” has gloomy Denmark chortling at the top of the pile and the Philippines languishing at 78, just behind “the land of smiles”, Thailand, at 76. The creator of this nonsensical project, an academic at the University of Leicester in the UK, has even provided a map of world “happiness”.
It seems it is based on being HEALTHY, WEALTHY and WISE ... so one of the criteria of these people is having more than enough money, which is practically understandable, since we all use money as a tool to get by in life!

GOD saw U w/o a Pretty Friend: so He created ME


joyes 38F
1129 posts

3/17/2007 12:27 am

    Quoting shery1:
    Earlier this happy month, another guide to global bliss, the “Happy Planet Index”, had the island nation of Vanuatu in first place, with the Philippines a respectable 17 (Denmark was in 99th place).

    These wildly differing results can be partly explained by methodological differences. The Leicester index places the highest value on health statistics, while the New Economics Foundation (compilers of the “Happy Planet Index” concentrates on “life satisfaction”, life expectancy and environmental footprint.
The ability to see things on a positive side is one indicator of being happy, not discounting material deprivation, but how to make do with what is available and being grateful about it adds to one's feeling of being happy!

GOD saw U w/o a Pretty Friend: so He created ME


joyes 38F
1129 posts

3/17/2007 12:29 am

    Quoting shery1:

    But isn’t the whole idea of indices to measure “happiness” nonsense? How can you conjure up objective variables to measure a subjective feeling like happiness?

    You can compile all the data you like, but in the end just look around you. That’s really the best way to figure out who is happy and who is not.
Yes that is true, because happiness is more of an individual feeling, depending on what makes a person feel happy!

GOD saw U w/o a Pretty Friend: so He created ME


joyes 38F
1129 posts

3/17/2007 12:31 am

    Quoting shery1:
    To start the ball rolling, the “torn and frayed dismal planet index” includes China, Britain, Russia, Cuba, and, yes, Denmark in the dark countries.

    On the other hand, people in Thailand, Italy, Ecuador, Australia, and the Philippines seem, in general, pretty glad to be alive.
Happiness stems from one's appreciation of the BEAUTY of LIFE itself!

GOD saw U w/o a Pretty Friend: so He created ME


fraz2000 36M
348 posts

3/23/2007 9:01 pm

    Quoting joyes:
    The ability to see things on a positive side is one indicator of being happy, not discounting material deprivation, but how to make do with what is available and being grateful about it adds to one's feeling of being happy!
Count your blessings, then you will know how lucky you are!

LaCE ... LOVE and CARE EVERYDAY


fraz2000 36M
348 posts

3/23/2007 9:02 pm

    Quoting joyes:
    Yes that is true, because happiness is more of an individual feeling, depending on what makes a person feel happy!
Don't dwell on annoying things, then you won't feel irritated!

LaCE ... LOVE and CARE EVERYDAY


fraz2000 36M
348 posts

3/23/2007 9:03 pm

    Quoting joyes:
    Happiness stems from one's appreciation of the BEAUTY of LIFE itself!
Life is beautiful and it is a gift so precious!

LaCE ... LOVE and CARE EVERYDAY


fraz2000 36M
348 posts

3/23/2007 9:04 pm

    Quoting elah12:
    Even how much we say that happiness in a choice and it stems from within us-to be content with what we have...money will still be a factor, especially to those who are in deep poverty....
We need it to sustain our needs! Being needy makes any person unhappy!

LaCE ... LOVE and CARE EVERYDAY


tri_ace70 31F
175 posts

3/23/2007 10:41 pm

    Quoting ROXYBARBIE:
    British residents find their level of happiness dropping and many want their government to step in, a poll concludes.

    Pollster GfK NOP found 36 percent of people asked are "very happy," compared to 52 percent found in a 1957 Gallup poll.
having national pride is away to gauge happiness in a group of people!

U can always count on me 4sure! Thats what friends R 4!


tri_ace70 31F
175 posts

3/23/2007 10:42 pm

    Quoting ROXYBARBIE:
    The happiness is something a little bit abstract concept that somehow we associate with our emotional state, and our emotional state depends of our point of view in a moment of our lives and it's hard to generalize to everyone...

    I think it's better a study about our life behaviours and satisfactions.
A country with love, peace and prosperity in the nation is a happy country!

U can always count on me 4sure! Thats what friends R 4!


tri_ace70 31F
175 posts

3/23/2007 10:43 pm

    Quoting ROXYBARBIE:
    The happiness is something a little bit abstract concept that somehow we associate with our emotional state, and our emotional state depends of our point of view in a moment of our lives and it's hard to generalize to everyone...

    I think it's better a study about our life behaviours and satisfactions.
We set our own ways to be happy!

U can always count on me 4sure! Thats what friends R 4!


tri_ace70 31F
175 posts

3/23/2007 10:43 pm

    Quoting joyes:
    It seems it is based on being HEALTHY, WEALTHY and WISE ... so one of the criteria of these people is having more than enough money, which is practically understandable, since we all use money as a tool to get by in life!
Yes, I believe every nation should strive for this!

U can always count on me 4sure! Thats what friends R 4!


tri_ace70 31F
175 posts

3/23/2007 10:44 pm

    Quoting joyes:
    Yes that is true, because happiness is more of an individual feeling, depending on what makes a person feel happy!
It is up to us to create our own happy world!

U can always count on me 4sure! Thats what friends R 4!


anabel57 57F
393 posts

4/8/2007 3:37 am

Happy Easter Day...

Ana


je10 36M
887 posts

4/13/2007 11:04 pm

    Quoting mandy1935:
    include with that also " honest politicians "
You are most certainly right Mandy!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.


je10 36M
887 posts

4/13/2007 11:05 pm

    Quoting chinatree:
    HAPPY BIRTHDAY
    May this Easter Day be Surrounded with happiness Filled with laughter Brightened with fun Blessed with love Remembered with joy and Enriched with hopes Here’s hoping that Easter brings to you What you wish and hope for…. Years & years of happy days Filled with lots of joy and blessings.

Hello Anabel, thanks Cat ... Have a beautiful Easter season!

Love dances with those who are on the dance floor.